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Monday, January 24, 2011

Palm Beach Post: Vaccine-autism link proved false?

Not sure why the Opinion Staff used a question mark in their title.  I think with the level of fraud and lying that was documented, it was never really a true question.  I urge you to go to the website and vote in the affirmative as far as the question is concerned.


Vaccine-autism link proved false?

by Opinion Staff

The puzzle piece symbol was first created in 1963 by the National Autistic Society.
In 1998 British Dr. Andrew Wakefield published in The Lancet a study he said showed a link between autism and the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella.

That study, which included only 12 children, has been under scientific attack for years. Nevertheless, it caused some parents of autistic children to blame themselves and their pediatricians for using the vaccine. It caused other parents not to inoculate their children, leaving them at risk for the diseases – and for spreading the diseases to others.

Now the British Medical Journal has published a report it says shows the original study – which The Lancet eventually retracted – was not just wrong. It was, the journal says, a case of fraud.

Medical histories of all 12 children in the original study were altered to make the vaccine seem to blame for their autism. Timelines were blurred to make it seem that symptoms that showed up before the children were inoculated had not appeared until after the vaccines were administered.

We think the British Medical Journal’s report debunks once and for all the supposed link between autism and the MMR vaccine. But what do you think? Is the vaccine-autism link debunked? Take our poll.

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